Footprints. A spokenword poem by pj johnson, Poet Laureate of the Yukon

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pj johnson Poet Laureate of the Yukon

pj johnson, the daughter of a Yukon trapper, was formally invested on Canada Day July 1st 1994 during a ceremony in Whitehorse where she was given the title Poet Laureate of the Yukon and became the first officially-invested poet laureate in Canada.

A storyteller in the oral tradition, her poems stories and songs have been televised and performed nationally and globally and published widely both in print and online. Active in the arts for decades as a visual and oral storyteller, mentor and performer at various venues across the nation, she is also an author, playwright, actor, musician, composer, teller of stories Yukon ambassador and a passionate animal rights advocate. Her poems, stories, plays and songs have been televised and performed nationally and globally and published widely in various books and journals in countries around the world and translated into several languages.

Diagnosed with nonverbal learning disorder in 2005 johnson encourages people with a learning disability to realize they can still pursue their dreams.

Known as the Yukon Raven Lady, johnson led a campaign to have the northern raven declared the official symbol of the Yukon in 1985.

On Canada Day 2020 pj johnson celebrated her 26th anniversary as Poet Laureate of the Yukon. She is the longest-serving Poet Laureate in Canada.

https://www.yukonpoetlaureate.com/

Her book “it’s howlin’ time!” is available at Mac’s Fireweed Books in Whitehorse. https://www.macsbooks.ca/  

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Published by darcie friesen hossack

Darcie Friesen Hossack is a graduate of the Humber School for Writers. Her short story collection, Mennonites Don’t Dance, was a runner-up for the Danuta Gleed Award, shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers Prize and the Ontario Library Association's Forest of Reading Evergreen Award for Adult Fiction. Citing irreverence, the book was banned by the LaCrete Public Library in Northern Alberta. Having mentored with Giller finalists Sandra Birdsell (The Russlander) and Gail Anderson Dargatz (Spawning Grounds, The Cure for Death by Lightening), Darcie is now completing her first novel where, for a family with a Seventh-day Adventist father and a Mennonite mother, the End Times are just around the corner. Darcie is also a four time judge of the Whistler Independent Book Awards, and a career food writer. She lives in Northern Alberta, Canada, with her husband, international award-winning chef, Dean Hossack.

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