Call for Mss. WordCity Literary Journal’s March 2022 Issue

It’s been two years now since Covid-19 circumvented the Globe. Two years of mitigations. Two years of sickness and loss. Two years of missing family, friends and the life events that bind us together. It’s also been two years of science denial. Of the continued rise of conspiracy theories and theorists. Two years of protestsContinue reading “Call for Mss. WordCity Literary Journal’s March 2022 Issue”

WordCity Literary Journal. January 2022. Issue 13. Writing Towards the Light

©®| All rights to the content of this journal remain with WordCity Literary Journal and its contributing artists. Table of Contents Letter from the Editor. Darcie Friesen Hossack with guest, Gordon Phinn Since Solstice, here in the North, we’ve gained a few precious minutes of daily light. Some days it’s hard to tell. It’s colderContinue reading “WordCity Literary Journal. January 2022. Issue 13. Writing Towards the Light”

Table of Contents. January 2022. Issue 13

Letter from the Editor. Darcie Friesen Hossack with guest, Gordon Phinn Fiction. Edited by Sylvia Petter Before the Seagulls. by Nightingale Jennings This Christmas. Fiction by Marzia Rahman A Wedding Gift. by Dave Kavanagh 1992. by DC Diamondopolous And Still Burning. by Mansour Noorbakhsh Carol. by Julia Abelsohn Sister Thresa’s Acting Class. by Pat JourdanContinue reading “Table of Contents. January 2022. Issue 13”

Letter from the Editor. Darcie Friesen Hossack with guest, Gordon Phinn

Since Solstice, here in the North, we’ve gained a few precious minutes of daily light. Some days it’s hard to tell. It’s colder now, so the warmth of the sun can feel far away. And yet, as certain as the earth’s path through the solar system, the light is returning. This issue, we are thankfulContinue reading “Letter from the Editor. Darcie Friesen Hossack with guest, Gordon Phinn”

This Christmas. fiction by Marzia Rahman

This Christmas This year, Christmas will come quietly, unceremoniously. There won’t be any Christmas party this time. Santa will come, wearing a mask, riding a chariot but he will avoid the crowd. April is the cruelest month—T. S. Eliot once wrote in his epic poem, The Waste Land—Ryan, a young Bulgarian poet in his earlyContinue reading “This Christmas. fiction by Marzia Rahman”

Carol. fiction by Julia Abelsohn

CAROL There’s no easy way to say this – I think I’m dead. I know I tend to be a pessimist – glass half empty or whatever – but I do believe that I’ve passed on to the other side. It’s because I’m having trouble moving my legs. I’m trying to move my left legContinue reading “Carol. fiction by Julia Abelsohn”

1992. fiction by DC Diamondopolous

  1992 A black cloud of smoke near the intersection of Florence and Normandie drifted toward Mrs. Kim’s California Dry Cleaning store in South Central Los Angeles. She turned the sign to closed and locked the door. Her husband phoned telling her to come home. The jury had acquitted the four white police officers accusedContinue reading “1992. fiction by DC Diamondopolous”

And Still Burning. fiction by Mansour Noorbakhsh

And Still Burning We — my colleague, and I —were in Rome, Italy, in the mid 90s. We had travelled there as the engineering team of an Iranian project to work with the vendor. The Iran-Iraq war had ended and some industrial projects had been re-started in Iran. As soon as we arrived and wereContinue reading “And Still Burning. fiction by Mansour Noorbakhsh”

A Wedding Gift. fiction by Dave Kavanagh

A Wedding Gift Dublin wept like a moody middle-aged woman, her tears cascading in a saccharin sleet of cherry blossom, the park littered with their detritus. Spring is so untidy. Despite the sunshine, a breeze cut in directly across the Mourne Mountains with fingers of Baltic ice that quickly made my skin feel raw. IContinue reading “A Wedding Gift. fiction by Dave Kavanagh”

Before the Seagulls. fiction by Nightingale Jennings

Before the Seagulls Ruby was noticeable in a crowd thanks to her jet-black hair and upright posture. At age 12, people referred to her as the girl with waist-long hair. Her hair had never grown below just a drop down from shoulder-length. Ruby tried, but it didn’t help to argue even when she was ableContinue reading “Before the Seagulls. fiction by Nightingale Jennings”